What is Quetiapine For?

Quetiapine is an antipsychotic medication. It works by altering the actions of chemicals in the brain. Quetiapine is used to treat schizophrenia in adults and children who are at least 13 years old. Quetiapine is used to treat bipolar disorder (manic depression) in adults and children who are at least 10 years old. Quetiapine is also used together with antidepressant medications to treat major depressive condition in adults.

Extended-release Quetiapine is for use only in adults and should not be given to anyone below 18 years of ages.

What is Quetiapine Used For

Important details

Never ever take Quetiapine in larger quantities, or for longer than advised by your doctor. High doses or long-lasting use can cause a serious motion condition that might not be reversible. Symptoms of this disorder include tremors or other unmanageable muscle movements.

Stop using Quetiapine and call your doctor simultaneously if you have the following symptoms: really stiff (stiff) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, quick or unequal heartbeats, tremblings, unchecked muscle movements, feeling light-headed, blurred vision, eye pain, increased thirst and urination, excessive cravings, fruity breath smell, weakness, queasiness and vomiting.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking Quetiapine. Stay alert to changes in your state of mind or symptoms. Report any brand-new or intensifying symptoms to your doctor.quetiapin

Quetiapine is not authorized for use in psychotic conditions connected to dementia. Quetiapine may increase the risk of death in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

Before taking this medication

You need to not use Quetiapine if you dislike seroquel.

Quetiapine is not authorized for use in psychotic conditions associated with dementia. Quetiapine may increase the risk of death in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

To make sure Quetiapine is safe for you, inform your doctor if you have:

  • liver or kidney disease
  • heart disease, heart rhythm problems, a history of cardiac arrest or stroke
  • high or low blood pressure
  • a history of low white blood cell (WBC) counts
  • irregular thyroid tests or prolactin levels
  • seizures or epilepsy
  • cataracts
  • high cholesterol or triglycerides
  • a personal or family history of diabetes
  • trouble swallowing.

Some youths have ideas about suicide when first taking Quetiapine. Your doctor will need to inspect your development at routine sees. Your family or other caretakers ought to likewise look out to changes in your state of mind or symptoms.

Taking antipsychotic medication during the last 3 months of pregnancy may cause problems in the newborn, such as withdrawal symptoms, breathing problems, feeding problems, fussiness, tremors, and limp or stiff muscles. Nevertheless, you might have withdrawal symptoms or other problems if you stop taking your medicine during pregnancy. If you become pregnant while taking Quetiapine, do not stop taking it without your doctor’s advice.

Quetiapine can enter breast milk and may damage a nursing baby. You must not breast-feed while you are using Quetiapine.

Do not give Quetiapine to a child without a doctor’s recommendations. Extended-release Quetiapine is for use only in adults and ought to not be given to anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take Quetiapine?

Never take Quetiapine in bigger amounts, or for longer than suggested by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. High dosages or long-term use of quetiapine can cause a serious movement disorder that might not be reversible. Symptoms of this condition include tremors or other uncontrollable muscle movements.

Take this medication with a full glass of water. You may take Quetiapine with or without food.

Do not squash, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole.

Quetiapine may cause you to have high blood glucose (hyperglycemia). If you are diabetic, inspect your blood sugar levels on a regular basis while you are taking Quetiapine.

You should not stop using Quetiapine suddenly. Stopping all of a sudden may make your condition even worse.

Blood pressure might have to be examined frequently in a child or teen taking Quetiapine.

Quetiapine can cause you to have an incorrect favorable drug screening test. If you offer a urine sample for drug screening, inform the lab personnel that you are taking Quetiapine.

Store at space temperature level far from moisture and heat.

Quetiapine dosing info

Normal Adult Dose of Quetiapine for Schizophrenia:

Immediate-release tablets:
Initial Dose: 25 mg orally twice a day.

The dosage may be increased in increments of 25 to 50 mg two times a day or 3 times a day on the 2nd and third days (as endured). By the 4th day a dose variety of 300 mg to 400 mg daily (divided into 2 or 3 doses a day) may be attained. Additional dose modifications (boosts or decreases) of 25 to 50 mg twice a day might be made, as needed. However, at least 2 days need to pass between the extra dosage modifications.

Efficacy in schizophrenia has been reported with dosages varying from 150 to 750 mg/day. Optimum medical effect has actually been reported at 300 mg/day. The safety of doses above 800 mg/day has actually not been assessed in scientific trials.

Extended-release tablets:
Initial dosage: 300 mg orally once daily without food or with a snack.
Upkeep dosage: 400 to 800 mg orally daily depending on action and tolerance.
Optimum dose: Doses above 800 mg daily have not been studied.

The dose of the extended-release tablets might be increased in increments of up to 300 mg daily at periods as short as 1 day.

The effectiveness of quetiapine in long-lasting use (over 6 weeks) has actually not been studied in clinical trials. Patients who respond favorably to quetiapine might be continued the most affordable dosage which works in maintaining their remission. Patients need to be periodically reassessed to identify their requirement for upkeep treatment.

Normal Adult Dose of Quetiapine for Bipolar Disorder:

Immediate-release tablets:
Mania related to bipolar I condition as monotherapy or as accessory therapy to lithium or divalproex:
Initial Dose: 50 mg orally twice a day

The dose might be increased to 200 mg orally twice daily on day 4 in increments of up to 50 mg two times daily. Further dose changes approximately 800 mg daily by day 6 ought to remain in increments of no higher than 200 mg/day. Information has actually been reported to indicate that most of patients responded in between 400 mg each day to 800 mg each day. The safety of doses above 800 mg daily has not been evaluated in scientific trials.

Immediate-release tablets:
Depressive episodes connected with bipolar illness:
Initial dosage: 50 mg orally once a day

The dose may be increased to reach 300 mg orally once a day by day 4. Some patients may require a more increase to 600 mg when a day by increasing the daily dosage to 400 mg on day 5 and 600 mg on day 8 of treatment. Efficacy was shown in this patient population at both 300 mg and 600 mg each day. However, no fringe benefit was observed in patients receiving 600 mg per day as compared to those patients getting 300 mg each day.

Extended-release tablets:

Bipolar Depression:
(Depressive Episodes Associated with Bipolar Disorder).
Normal dosage of Quetiapine for Acute Treatment: administer orally daily at night starting with 50 mg per day and increasing doses to reach 300 mg daily by day 4.
Advised Dosing Schedule: Day 1 – 50 mg, Day 2 – 100, mg, Day 3 – 200 mg, & Day 4 – 300 mg.

Bipolar Mania:
Normal dosage of Quetiapine for Acute Monotherapy or Adjunct Therapy (with lithium or divalproex): administer orally daily in the evening beginning with 300 mg on day 1, 600 mg on day 2, and adjust in between 400 mg and 800 mg daily thereafter depending on the clinical action and tolerance of the private patient.

Bipolar Maintenance:
Continue treatment at the dose required to maintain symptom remission.
While there is no body of proof offered to specifically resolve the length of time patients must stay on quetiapine extended-release tablets, upkeep of effectiveness in Bipolar I Disorder has actually been demonstrated with quetiapine (administered orally two times daily totaling 400 to 800 mg daily) as accessory therapy to lithium or divalproex. Usually, in the upkeep phase, patients advanced the same dosage on which they were supported during the stabilization stage. Patients must be occasionally reassessed to identify the requirement for upkeep treatment and the suitable dosage for such treatment.

Typical Adult Dose of Quetiapine for Depression:

As adjunctive therapy to antidepressants for use in the treatment of significant depressive disorder:

Extended-release tablets:

Preliminary dosage: 50 mg orally once daily in the evening.

On day 3, the dosage can be increased to 150 mg once daily in the evening.

Range: 150 mg to 300 mg orally daily. Dosages above 300 mg have not been studied.

Normal Geriatric Dose of Quetiapine for Schizophrenia:

Immediate-release tablets:
Initial Dose: 25 mg orally when a day.

The dosage may be increased daily in increments of 25 mg/day to 50 mg/day to an efficient dose, depending on the scientific action and tolerability of the patient.

Effectiveness in schizophrenia has actually been reported with dosages varying from 150 to 750 mg/day. Maximum clinical impact has actually been reported at 300 mg/day. The safety of doses above 800 mg/day has actually not been assessed in medical trials.

Extended-release tablets:
When a reliable immediate-release dose has actually been reached (above 200 mg), the patient may be switched to the extended-release solution at an equivalent dosage.

The effectiveness of quetiapine in long-term use (over 6 weeks) has actually not been studied in clinical trials. Patients who react favorably to quetiapine might be continued the lowest dosage which works in preserving their remission. Patients should be regularly reassessed to determine their need for upkeep treatment.

Typical Geriatric Dose of Quetiapine for Bipolar Disorder:

Extended-release tablets:
Preliminary dosage: 50 mg/day.
The dosage can be increased in increments of 50 mg/day depending on the reaction and tolerance of the individual patient.

What happens if I miss out on a dose?

Take the missed out on dose as quickly as you keep in mind. Skip the missed out on dose if it is practically time for your next arranged dose. Do not take additional medication to make up the missed out on dose.

What takes place if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of quetiapine can be fatal.

What should I avoid while taking Quetiapine?

Hazardous side effects could happen.

Quetiapine might impair your thinking or responses. Be careful if you own or do anything that requires you to be alert. Prevent getting up too quickly from a sitting or lying position, or you might feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in heat. You might be more susceptible to heat stroke.

Quetiapine side effects

Get emergency situation medical help if you have signs of an allergy to Quetiapine: hives; problem breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Report any brand-new or getting worse symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, difficulty sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or injuring yourself.

Call your doctor simultaneously if you have:

  • twitching or unmanageable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs;
  • mask-like appearance of the face, problem swallowing, problems with speech;
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might lose consciousness;
  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;
  • severe nerve system response – extremely stiff (stiff) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, quick or uneven heartbeats, tremblings, passing out;
  • high blood sugar level – increased thirst, increased urination, appetite, dry mouth, fruity breath smell, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, weight loss; or
  • low blood cell counts – abrupt weakness or ill sensation, fever, chills, cold or influenza symptoms, cough, sore throat, red or swollen gums, painful mouth sores, skin sores, trouble breathing.

Common Quetiapine side effects might include:

  • difficulty with movement;
  • dizziness, weakness;
  • increased hunger, weight gain;
  • sore throat;
  • dry mouth; or
  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, constipation.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others might take place. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You might report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Quetiapine?

Quetiapine can cause a serious heart issue if you use particular medications at the same time, consisting of antibiotics, antidepressants, heart rhythm medicine, antipsychotic medications, and medicines to treat cancer, malaria, HIV or AIDS. Inform your doctor about all medications you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with Quetiapine.

Taking Quetiapine with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can cause harmful or life-threatening side effects. Ask your doctor before taking a sleeping tablet, narcotic pain medicine, prescription cough medication, a muscle relaxer, or medication for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Lots of drugs can interact with quetiapine. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medications and any you start or stop using, particularly:

  • antibiotic or antifungal medication
  • antiviral medicine to treat hepatitis or HIV/AIDS
  • heart or blood pressure medication
  • medication to treat mental illness
  • St. John’s wort
  • seizure medicine
  • tuberculosis medication.

This list is not complete and many other drugs can connect with quetiapine. This includes prescription and non-prescription medications, vitamins, and herbal products. Give a list of all your medications to any doctor who treats you.

 

Updated: 26.12.2016 — 08:59

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